When someone suffers a stroke, their brain is abruptly deprived of the blood, oxygen and other nutrients it needs — and brain cells can die within minutes. Timely treatment is essential. With the appropriate care, much of the damage from a stroke can be halted or even reversed. When that care is delayed because of a misdiagnosis or overlooked symptoms, however, the results can be catastrophic.

In 2014, researchers led by a specialist from Johns Hopkins Hospital noticed a disturbing trend after analyzing the government data available on stroke victims. Who you are may have as much of a chance of affecting your ability to get appropriate treatment for a stroke as anything else.

The early signs of a potential life-altering stroke, including headaches and dizziness, drive tens of thousands of people to emergency rooms each year — only to get sent back home again without a proper diagnosis because they’re under the age of 45, female or part of an ethnic minority.

For example, if you’re under 45 years of age, a doctor is seven times more likely to send you home from a hospital trip with a misdiagnosis or without treatment altogether when you’re actually suffering from the early signs of a stroke.

Many potential stroke victims who are misdiagnosed are told that they have nothing more serious than an ear infection or a migraine — if they’re given any diagnosis at all. About half of those people will have their strokes within 48 hours of being dismissed without further concern from an emergency room.

If your pre-stroke symptoms were brushed off when you sought treatment at a hospital or your close relative suffered a stroke after such treatment, you may be entitled to compensation. A stroke can have devastating consequences on the remainder of an individual’s life and leave permanent disabilities. Please continue exploring our site or contact our office directly for more information.